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‘The water is still very cold’: Lymington RNLI warning after early morning swim off Tanners Lane beach results in pair being rescued





AN early morning swim off Lymington resulted in two people having to be rescued, with one taken to hospital.

Lymington RNLI has issued a reminder that the water is “still very cold” after it was alerted by HM Coastguard to reports of a person in the Solent off Tanners Lane beach shortly after 7.30am on Saturday.

Launched within eight minutes, the David Bradley inshore lifeboat’s crew quickly found two casualties in the water and hauled them on board.

A lifeboat crew member searching for the casualty in the water (picture: RNLI/Joanna Styles)
A lifeboat crew member searching for the casualty in the water (picture: RNLI/Joanna Styles)

Helm Phil Baker said afterwards: “When the shout goes out to a person in the water, we are acutely aware that every second counts.”

The pair, who were said to be very cold and extremely grateful to be saved, were put into thermal protective aids and neoprene hats.

They were then rushed back to Lymington where they were taken ashore to warm up in the boathouse.

At this point it was discovered that one of the men had stripped off and gone for a swim.

Seeing his friend in trouble, the other had rung 999 before himself going into the water to help.

One of the swimmers was taken by ambulance to hospital with suspected hypothermia, while the other was released and taken home by police.

Thermal protective aids and neoprene hats were used to warm up the rescued swimmers (picture: RNLI/Joanna Styles)
Thermal protective aids and neoprene hats were used to warm up the rescued swimmers (picture: RNLI/Joanna Styles)

Crew member Simon Naylor said: “When your body hits cold water, ‘cold shock’ can cause dramatic changes in breathing, heart rate and blood pressure.

“We remind everyone that the water is still very cold at this time of year.

“The lad did the right thing dialling 999 but took a risk entering the water himself.”

He added: “In an emergency situation, the speed in which you call for help can mean the difference between life and death.”



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