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Extraordinary meeting called to discuss changes to Pennyfarthing Homes' housing plan for land off Brockhills Lane, New Milton



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AN extraordinary meeting has been called to discuss a developer’s changes to proposals for a controversial housing development on the edge of New Milton.

As reported by the A&T, Pennyfarthing Homes has cut three units from its previous 169-home plan for former greenbelt land off Brockhills Lane following talks with New Forest District Council.

Now a special town council planning committee meeting will review the amendments, which also include revised highways plans amid concerns over the impact on the local roads.

Pennyfarthing Homes has made changes to its plan for Brockhills Lane
Pennyfarthing Homes has made changes to its plan for Brockhills Lane

Members had joined more than 400 residents lodging objections to Pennyfarthing’s original proposal after holding an extraordinary planning committee meeting in October last year.

Retaining its pledge for 50% affordable provision, Pennyfarthing said it had carried out additional work to address concerns over the effect on the roads.

Land and planning director Ben Arnold said: “We have been keen to respond positively to feedback to ensure that this development reflects aspirations for the character and appearance of the area.”

He added the developer would continue to “work with the council and others to help realise the potential of this site”.

But Neill Crawford who, alongside a team of residents, runs the 360-strong campaign group Residents Against the Development of Brockhills Lane (RADBL), argued not enough had been done.

“[Objections] will basically be exactly the same as before on account that the amendments are superficial and do not address the size of the development or singular exit point, tandem garages, etc,” he said.

Residents against the development (from left) Chris Forbes-Ritte, Laura Travis, Ellie Francis and Neill Crawford at the site
Residents against the development (from left) Chris Forbes-Ritte, Laura Travis, Ellie Francis and Neill Crawford at the site

Mr Crawford had told the October planning committee meeting the development would have an unacceptable impact on traffic, while other opponents cited the distance from shops, schools, doctors’ surgeries and other amenities.

Ellie Francis, who also runs RADBL, warned the road can already be “absolutely treacherous”.

“Who will take responsibility for the first fatality which will inevitably occur?” she asked.

The town council has secured a later deadline for its own comments following the extraordinary meeting taking place on Tuesday 3rd May at 6.30pm in the town hall in Ashley Road.

A previous artist's impression of the access road
A previous artist's impression of the access road

Attendance will be registered, with seating available on a first-come-first-served basis or booked ahead of time.

The revised application has kept accessible open spaces and play areas, pedestrian and cycle connections, and electric vehicle charging points.

The location is a strategic housing site identified in NFDC’s Local Plan of development policies.

NFDC’s decision is expected in the coming months.



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