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Met Office says June 2023 will be the hottest on record





June 2023 is on track to be the hottest on record according to data going back to 1884.

While the weather over the next few days is likely to see a return to more average temperatures for this time of year, it won’t be enough to cool down what has been an exceptionally hot month, say forecasters.

June 2023 is expected to become the hottest June on record. Picture: iStock
June 2023 is expected to become the hottest June on record. Picture: iStock

This month, predicts the Met Office, is likely to beat all previous records thanks in part to temperatures hovering around 25C for at least a fortnight.

Until now it has been June 1940 to hold the record for the hottest June ever with the June of 1976 – part of the well-known scorching summer of 1976 – in second place.

But thanks consistent spells of good weather and some record breaking temperatures earlier this month, when some parts of England basked in 32C and prompted both the Met Office to issue numerous heat health alerts, all records are now set to be broken.

Crowds have flocked to beaches as the weather has been unseasonably hot this month
Crowds have flocked to beaches as the weather has been unseasonably hot this month

The Met Office’s Mike Kendon explained: “With only a few days of near-average temperatures forecast for the remainder of the month, overall this June will turn out to be provisionally the hottest June on record for the UK for both mean and average maximum temperature.

“Meteorologically, June started with high pressure over the UK bringing often settled and dry conditions with plenty of sunshine. Once that high pressure subsided, warm, humid air took charge over the UK, with 32.2C the highest temperature recorded so far this month and high temperatures for the vast majority of the UK.

“What has been particularly unusual is the persistent warmth for much of the month, with temperatures reaching 25C widely for at least a fortnight, and at times 28 to 30C – whereas we would more typically expect maximum temperatures in the high teens or low 20s at this time of year.”

But the hot weather has not proved good news for all.

The RSPCA warned reptile owners to remain vigilant to escapees. Image: iStock.
The RSPCA warned reptile owners to remain vigilant to escapees. Image: iStock.

The RSPCA was also forced to issue a snake escape warning after revealing that it was seeing a marked surge in calls to its hotline about runaway reptiles who were being made more active by the hot weather.

The unusually warm June also prompted the Environment Agency to ask people to report signs of algae bloom or fish in distress after noticing an increase in dead animals in its waters.

Experts said the hot weather and recent thunderstorms is likely to have had an impact on oxygen levels in the water.

The Environment Agency has been asking people to be alert to signs of fish in distress
The Environment Agency has been asking people to be alert to signs of fish in distress

Dave Webb, Environment Agency area fisheries manager, explained: “We aim to respond to reports of fish in distress as quickly as possible and will assist and advise landowners and fisheries who look after private lakes, ponds and watercourses.

“Help from the public goes a very long way, which is why we provide free advice to all on how to protect fish during hot weather.

“If you see any fish in distress, algal blooms or suspect a fish disease outbreak, please tell us immediately by calling the Environment Agency’s National Incident Hotline on 0800 80 70 60.”



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