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Youngsters help compile exhibit about engineering firm Wellworthy Ltd's impact on Lymington



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YOUNGSTERS delved into the past to explore an engineering firm which was once one of Lymington’s biggest employers.

St Barbe Museum and Art Gallery and Lymington library teamed up with Year 6 and 7 pupils to create an exhibition about piston ring manufacturer Wellworthy Ltd.

The six-week project saw the children become local history detectives, working with museum and library staff once a week after school.

Lymington youngsters worked with St Barbe Museum and Art Gallery and Lymington library to create the exhibition (photo: Lymington library)
Lymington youngsters worked with St Barbe Museum and Art Gallery and Lymington library to create the exhibition (photo: Lymington library)

They learned how to conduct research, create displaying for different audiences, and how to safely exhibit artefacts.

The small display at the library also focuses on experienced engineer John Howlett, who in 1912 took over the firm, then known as South Coast Garages.

Renamed seven years later, Wellworthy employed 1,800 people in Lymington by the 1970s, with 5,000 employees overall in factories there, as well as in Ringwood, Salisbury, Weymouth and Bridgwater. The business finally ceased operations in 1989.

Praising the project’s success, St Barbe learning and engagement officer Verity Kerins said: “The young people were very engaged and the feedback they’ve given us is really positive.

“Working with our colleagues at Lymington library and drawing on their expert knowledge and local history collections alongside our own was a perfect partnership.”

Wellworthy and Our Town is on show throughout the school summer holidays.



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