Home   Lifestyle   Article

Lymington Players sell out ‘Allo ‘Allo at town’s Malt Hall Theatre





ATMOSPHERIC French songs and accordion music set the scene when Lymington Players put on everybody's favourite long-running wartime sitcom, 'Allo 'Allo.

Neil Brooks was great fun as the hapless, long-suffering café owner René, desperately trying to keep hold of the innumerable threads throughout. He constantly juggles the ever-increasing demands of the Germans, the Resistance, his enamoured waitresses and, not forgetting of course, his battle-axe wife, Edith.

Allo Allo, Lymington Players
Allo Allo, Lymington Players

Chris Talbot in her first role with the Players was superbly over the top as Edith, the café's tone-deaf songbird whose 'musical' appearances were wonderfully ear-splitting.

Jessica Anderson and Pamela Jackson were the flighty waitresses Yvette and Mimi, the latter uttering lethal threats against the dastardly enemy soldiers when she is not falling into René's arms.

Allo Allo, Lymington Players
Allo Allo, Lymington Players

Negar Esfandiary was the confident Michelle of the Resistance striding onto the stage delivering her message – ”Listen very carefully, I will say this only once” – before disappearing like a phantom into the night, and Emily Norris slinked on as her accomplice, exclaiming “It is I, Leclerc”.

Allo Allo, Lymington Players
Allo Allo, Lymington Players

Chris March in his third appearance in the role was superb as Officer Crabtree. His mangled attempts at speaking French with such an atrocious 'franglais' accent were a real scene-stealer.

Guy Standley and James Hoare doubled as the English airmen, popping up from behind the bar for brief comments, and as peasants, mostly to be turfed out of the café by the Germans.

David Hughes played the bumbling wig-wearing Colonel von Strohm with ease and Adam Ogilvie was realistic as the ebullient hot-blooded Captain Betorelli, especially in his cinema encounter with Helga. David Forgham-Bailey was splendidly overbearing as General Schmelling.

Allo Allo, Lymington Players
Allo Allo, Lymington Players

Stella Henney and Alan Harris, also in his first role with the company, were a fantastic duo as Helga and the Gestapo agent, Herr Flick, their performances bouncing off each other as the scenes progressed – I especially liked the scene when she was helping him dress.

Paul Woodford was excellent as the joyously camp, tank-driving Lieutenant Gruber with a crush on René, the miscommunications between the pair smoothly timed.

Directed by Amanda Harber, the talented cast put on a splendid evening. Even when you know the jokes, the punchlines, and exactly what is coming next and you still laugh out loud, then that is a job well done.

Alison Smith



This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse the site you are agreeing to our use of cookies - Learn More