Ten years’ jail for ‘dangerous’ thug who bottled friend and carjacked driver

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Bradie Shkensberg
Bradie Shkensberg was slated by judge Peter Henry for his behaviour.

A “DANGEROUS” thug who repeatedly bottled a friend and then carjacked a motorist as he fled the scene has been jailed for 10 years.

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Bradie Shkensberg was sent down at Southampton Crown Court by Judge Peter Henry who said the sentence was necessary to protect the public.

“I’ve had to consider if you are a dangerous offender and I have absolutely no doubt you are dangerous,” Judge Henry said.

“Your previous convictions, the facts of this case, the nature of these offences and your easy reliance upon drugs and alcohol that fuels your behaviour means you do pose a substantial risk of causing serious harm to members of the public.”

Prosecutor Jeremy Wright said Shkensberg (27) was fuelled by jealousy that his girlfriend Jayne Dawe had chemistry with his friend, Shaun Dalton, so attacked him in Ashurst.

Skhensberg had warned he would “punish” her by beating up any man she had spoken to, Mr Wright told the court, and he was good on his word on December 14th last year.

The defendant (pictured) and Ms Dawe had gone to Mr Dalton’s flat that night for a meal and drinks. While they were there he suddenly carried his girlfriend into the kitchen before smashing a beer bottle over the victim’s head.

As Mr Dalton crumpled to the floor, Shkensberg, who lived at Salisbury Road, Totton, punched and kicked him before picking up a second bottle, which he also used.

Mr Dalton attempted to defend himself but Shkensberg got a third bottle and struck the victim again, Mr Wright said, as he stressed the “sustained” nature of the attack.

Mr Dalton scrambled to his feet but as he and Shkensberg came together, the defendant leaned across and bit Mr Dalton on the back, causing a puncture wound to the skin.

Shkensberg fled the scene with bloodied hands and, out in the street, confronted Samuel Glasspool, who was in his car having just collected a takeaway.

“The engine was running and he had reversed a little way when the defendant came to the front of his car with money in his hand,” Mr Wright told the court.

“At which point Samuel Glasspool said ‘I’m not an Uber driver’, and then the defendant says ‘I don’t care, you have got to take me somewhere. If you don’t, I’ll kick the s*** out of you and I’ve just bottled my girlfriend’s sister’s boyfriend’.”

Because of his menacing nature, Mr Glasspool decided to comply. As they drove Shkensberg made a call and told a friend he had “just carjacked someone”.

When he was dropped off in Totton Shkensberg refused to give Mr Glasspool his mobile phone, which was not recovered.

Mr Wright told the court the 14th December incident was the culmination of odd behaviour by Shkensberg in the months before. Shkensberg had on one occasion turned up at Mr Dalton’s workplace while drunk, threatening him and accusing him of an affair with Ms Dawe.

Shkensberg later apologised, but also attacked his girlfriend at her home, pushing her on the bed and telling her “give me some” before branding her a “slut”, spitting in her face and slapping her.

Mr Wright explained Mr Dalton and the defendant were friends for around 10 years before losing touch. However, they began speaking again in 2018, met up and became friendly again, with Mr Dalton introducing Shkensberg to Ms Dawe because she was his girlfriend’s sister.

Mercifully, Mr Wright went on, Mr Dalton’s injuries suffered in the bottling were largely superficial, as the cuts to his head were shallow and he had bruising around his ears.

At the time of the bottling, Shkensberg was on licence from prison having been jailed for 18 months in 2018 for violence on a previous partner.

His lengthy record included other domestic incidents which concerned previous partners, the court heard, as well as other matters including disorderly behaviour and aggravated burglary.

The defendant’s behaviour, Mr Wright continued, left Ms Dawe “scared”. In a victim statement she said: “I’m terrified Bradie will come back and is going to be so angry that he will beat me up. Knowing his aggressive side, I fully believe he would kill me.

“If he does not come for me himself, I’m scared he will have someone else do it for him. I don’t feel safe anymore.”

Mr Glasspool said: “I’ve worked all over the world and never would have thought I’d be carjacked in the New Forest.”

Shkensberg appeared before the court having pleaded guilty to three charges: assault occasioning grievous bodily harm, kidnap and assault.

Defending, Jamie Gammon said his client worked and had the potential to be an upstanding member of society. However, his offending and bad behaviour was fuelled by drink and drugs. “He really needs some professional help to sort himself out,” Mr Gammon added.

He pleaded with the judge to keep the sentence as short as possible to give his client “some hope and opportunity” in the future.

But imposing an extended sentence with a five-year licence period once he is freed, Judge Henry said it was “lucky” Mr Dalton had not been badly hurt, adding: “It was [also] a very unpleasant offence of kidnap on an innocent man not doing anything more than getting a meal.”

After the sentencing DC Marie Harding from Hampshire Police said: “Shkensberg’s unprovoked violence on that night directly impacted on three people, as well as having an effect on others who witnessed what he did. His actions could have led to more serious consequences.

“I hope that today’s sentence gives some degree of closure and reassurance to the victims so they can now move on with their lives.”

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